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Speaker: Tomislav Medak

Tmedak

Tomislav Medak a PhD researcher at the Coventry Unversity's Centre for Postdigital Cultures, member of the theory and publishing team of Multimedia Institute/MAMA in Zagreb and militant for the urban activist initiative Right to the City Zagreb. His research interest is in technologies, capitalist development and post-capitalist transition, with a particular focus on economies of intellectual property and unevenness of techno-science. He contributed to the 4th Int. Degrowth Conference with a talk on technologies, green growth and degrowth transition.

Tomislav Medak is a doctoral student at the Centre for Postdigital Cultures at Coventry University. He is also member of the theory and publishing team of the Multimedia Institute/MAMA in Zagreb, as well as amateur librarian for the Memory of the World/Public library project and militant for the urban activist initiative Right to the City Zagreb.

Since 2000 Tomislav has (co-)organised talks, conferences and publications in the fields of political economy, tactical media and the commons. His recent scholarship is on technologies, capitalist development and post-capitalist transition, with a particular focus on economies of intellectual property and unevenness of techno-science. At times, he also writes and presents on theatre, dance and politics. He's the author of two short books: The Hard Matter of Abstraction – A Guidebook to Domination by Abstraction (V_____erlag für Handbücher, 2016) and Shit Tech for A Shitty World (Aksioma, 2015). Recently his essay ‘Technologies for an Ecological Transition: A Faustian Bargain?’ came out with the Institute for Political Ecology (2017).

Intermittently, Tomislav is working as a performer, dramaturge and director with the Zagreb-based experimental theatre collective BADco. With the collective he has created numerous artworks, including performances Correcting Rhythm (2017), Spores (2016), A Pound of Histeria, Acceleration... melodrama (2014), The League of Time (2010) and 1 poor and one 0, many of which have toured across Europe, while the interactive installation Responsibility for Things Seen was presented in 2011 Venice Biennal.